Harm Reduction: a List

This is a rather short list of instances of harm reduction in the world around you (there are probably enough instances that no one human could ever list them all).

Roadway Safety

  • Seatbelts
  • Airbags
  • Licensing of Drivers
  • Bicycle Helmets
  • Crash Tests
  • Guard Rails
  • Speed Limits
  • Medians and Divided Roadways
  • Signage
  • Reflectors
  • Middle Brakelight
  • Anti-lock Brakes

The safety of roadways has mainly focused on technological improvements, which are plenty, to both the vehicles and the roadways. This has undoubtedly influenced the direction of attempting to reduce pollution from road-based transport (at least in the USA) via technology (i.e., reducing mileage, rather than limiting driving).

Other technological progress has lagged, though. Making self-servicing easier has not been a priority, for example. Changing signal bulbs or the oil or brakes often requires special knowledge, tools, and equipment. This actually can increase harm, as the cost of vehicle maintenance (in both time and money) may deter some amount of otherwise-necessary work.

Building and Home Safety

The refrigerator door provides a nice counterpoint to roadways. Car companies have largely embraced technology-based solutions, where the refrigerator companies, at least initially, were opposed.

Some systems such as HVAC were initially designed for comfort, but nonetheless can be essential to maintain life under extreme temperatures.

Food and Drugs Safety

  • Child-resistant Containers
  • Lollipops with a Soft, Loop Handle
    See: Saf-T-Pops.
  • Cooking Attire
    • Hairnets
    • Gloves
    • Aprons
    • Mitts
  • Restaurant inspections
  • Drug Labeling
  • Dosage Utensils (e.g., specialized measuring spoons)

Many (most?) professions have some required or suggested garb. The older the profession, the more likely that the particulars were originally developed through experience rather than through particular association rules or governmental regulation.

It is noteworthy that child-resistant caps are not required to avoid 100% of opening attempts by children, but only some majority of attempts. Like many other things, the best harm reduction for children is keeping things away from them, rather than trying to lock them up enough that children can, e.g., play with dynamite safely.

Disease and Contaminant Prevention

  • Hand-washing
  • Attire
    • Surgical Masks
    • Face Shields
    • Scrubs
    • Gloves
  • Protocols and Procedures (e.g., counting implements before and after surgery)
  • Single-use Needles

There are often specialized procedures or protocols developed to avoid mistakes and prevent malfeasance. Imagine how different roadway safety would be with a two-driver minimum per vehicle.

On the other hand, how would outcomes change for medicine if a double-blind second-opinion system were instituted for at least some subset of ailments.

Occupational Safety

  • Attire
    • Work Boots
    • Eye and Face Protection
  • Protocols and Procedures
    • Chain of Custody
    • Two-man Rule

Some harm reduction techniques, such as chain of custody, are equally effective at avoiding malfeasance as protecting other properties (e.g., ensuring medicine maintains its conditions in transport).