10,000 Days

From a poignant tribute to Maynard’s mother to railing against television, messages of hope and indictments of man’s great crimes culiminate to form the latest Tool record.

As Tool is my favorite band I’ll do my best to keep this review brief. The album really speaks for itself.

The album contains very classical elements, including influences of 1960s & 1970s rock & roll (including Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd), as well as the influences of Jazz & Blues. These are found alongside the “progressive rock” sound Tool is known for, and the two sounds transit seamlessly between one another.

Part of the motive for Keenan’s vocal stylings are revealed in the two-song tribute to his mother Judith Marie Keenan (“Wings for Marie (Pt 1)” and “10,000 Days (Wings Pt 2)”). In the latter, a mention is made to the gift his mother passed on to him, which seems to indicate a large role Keenan’s mother played in his development of his voice.

Each song on the record hits hard in its own way.

Loving rememberance for his mother and dispisement of superficial Christians who would attend her funeral are brought out in “Wings for Maire” and “10,000 Days.”

The human tendency toward being swept up in illusions and habits in “Vicarious,” as well as the two-part “Lost Keys (Blame Hofmann),” and “Rosetta Stoned.” The last even gives claim to the doom of man under a particular ailment.

“Vicarious” may fit the bill for “radio friendly,” as I don’t listen to the radio enough to make that determination. It seems odd to me, however, for a song as anti-television as it to be deemed such. It details the commercialization of tragedy via the media, to turn us all into their vehicles of profit.

“Rosetta Stoned” and its introduction “Lost Keys (Blame Hofmann)” are a story about a man on an acid trip who finds himself in the hospital still coming down. The medical personnel ask him what has happened, and he reveals the strange journey he has been through to be told the horrible fate man has in store for himself, except he has forgotten.

“The Pot” and “Right in Two” reveal the predatory, self-righteous nature of man in his quest for dominance. Musically, both are candidates for protest songs of Vietnam, transformed into a modern climate.

“Jambi” and “Intension” walk a line between hope and malevolence.

Finally, “Lipan Conjuring” and “Viginti Tres” confound us in their abstract, fragmented natures. The former is a First Nations track of chanting and drums, while the latter is a bizarre soundscape in the vein of “(-) ions.”

Anyway, as I said I’ve kept it short. I may add more if I feel it necessary, or alternatively write up my in-depth interpretations at a later date.

Butcher redux

Well I seem to get a lot of hits on this page from people looking for Butcher information.

I thought I’d take this opportunity to throw some resources out there since my page doesn’t really have the wealth of Butcher-related info that you may be looking for.

Here is a nice show review of Butcher, and also on that page you may find a review of a Danny Carey project called VOLTO!.

This page has the lyrics. It’s not a great format, just the raw lyrics. Also, realize the final song “Cold” is an interpretation as that track did not have lyrics included in the liner.

Anyway, that’s it for now. Hopefully this will help those that end up hitting this site looking for Butcher info.

More redesign on the way

This is an article about USAG Roberto Gonzales calling for new “data retention rules” for ISPs (the people that you pay to use the internet).

Basically, he says there’s a need for a standard because the people that do crime fighting need that information.

The reason why this is stupid is that we could all be masking our data, what servers we access, etc. Tor is a program designed to do just that. It works reasonably well, but it would work better if more people used it. If you are going to continue to “crack down” on businesses that provide services for the internet, most people will begin to use that sort of technology. Once that happens, you lose the ballgame altogether.

It’s a mixed bag, and it’s another area of the world where we need to have a sit-down as a society and come to a solution. But we’re too fucking lazy. Ah well, maybe the next species to evolve thumbs will think of it. Selah.

As a side note, I want to say I love every single person, and I believe we are capable of making changes to this world that will serve us and future generations in ways we could only dream of. Please, why don’t we?

sc–pture

My Deviantart Page (top 12 on that page, starting with bottom right)

It’s annoying that deviantart doesn’t have a better deviation structure set up. This is really not the optimal way to view this.
I have a .pdf output of it, but it’s 24 megabytes, which is rather large to post here…so if you’d like me to send you a copy, drop me an e-mail.

Google: Windows Users are Secondclass Netizens.

If you’ve ever been to Google Video, you may have tried to download the video onto your computer. If you do this with Windows, however, Google tries to force you to download their player, and the video in what’s either .gvp or .gvi format. These are formats that actually just link their player to the video stored on their servers.

If you use linux, however, they will gladly give you access directly to the .avi format of the video. Straight to your hard drive.

Why the discrepancy and how can you combat it?

First the latter: change/”spoof” your User Agent string in your browser. Basically, you want your browser to report itself as a non-Windows operating system. That is the sole determination of how Google formats its links. That is why it’s sending you the player and the bogus format.

I’m assuming you use Firefox or another sane browser. Opera likely has a method for changing the useragent. Via Firefox you’ll want to use an extension (User Agent Switcher) and have it be a linux-based useragent. (google is your friend, and I’m too lazy to give complete instructions) The temporary-switch is superior to using the Firefox built-in “general.useragent.override” option, as it changes the useragent on startup and can cause some problems with the HTTP headers with some extensions.

Now why does Google do this? The best guess I’ve got is usage data. The majority of computers are windows, and thus they are a primary advertising audience. By getting the player downloaded, they may be able to gather statistics on how often you watch the content and what content you watch. Apparently the .gvp/.gvi format is a symbolic/metafile sort of like a .torrent file. It stores the info of what content you’ll want if you access it. The player then downloads the content. It’ll probably cache a copy for a limited time, but provided you go back to that video in the future it will likely redownload it.

That’s my best guess. The other plausible explanation is that they are “ensuring availability” of the video via having a player for you. Maybe some people don’t have a player for .avi files.

And of course, it helps them spread their brand. More software on your computer by Google leads to more trust and familiarity with the brand leads to future opportunities and greater revenues.

Peace.